Victoria 2022 Commonwealth Games Budget Set At $955 Million, But Bid May Not Get Funding

The bid by Victoria, Canada to host the 2022 Commonwealth Games Wednesday unveiled a (CDN) $955 million plan for the project.  The budget includes costs for a new arena, new stadium and a university housing complex that will first be used for the Athletes’ Village.  Capital costs will reach $298 million but that doesn’t include an expected highway upgrade.

Capital investment will be required to prepare eight venues.

Victoria, British Columbia skyline (Photo: Brandon Godfrey)

Victoria, British Columbia skyline (Photo: Brandon Godfrey)

Victoria last hosted the Commonwealth Games in 1994.

The bid will be seeking $400 million from both Federal and Provincial governments as well as additional funding from the Federal government for security, but neither have made any commitments to the project.  The Federal government is currently evaluating funding requests for a possible Calgary 2026 Olympic Winter Games and a FIFA World Cup in 2026 where Canada could host 10 matches, sharing the rest with the United States and Mexico.

British Columbia Finance Minister Carole James told CBC that she was considering the bid very cautiously and said more due diligence was required before plans could move forward,

“Her job is to say no. We have to convince her. It is not going to be easy,” bid Chair David Black told the Times-Colonist.

If the Province agrees to the bid plans, British Columbia taxpayers would be on the hook for any cost overruns.

Bid officials recognize that timing is tight as a full report including government commitments are due into the Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF) September 30 and more time may be needed.

“I think the other bidding cities would be delighted [with an extension], because they probably need one, too,” Black said.

But the reality is, some of the other bids are better prepared.

[Follows below]

INCOME Amount (Cdn)
Provincial Government * (cash)  400,000,000
Federal Government * (cash)  400,000,000
Municipal (in-kind)  25,000,000
Commercial ** (cash)  130,000,000
Total Income  955,000,000
EXPENDITURE
Capital (see below)  298,000,000
Games Services  275,000,000
Workforce  157,000,000
Administration  55,000,000
Ceremonies  24,000,000
Contingency  71,000,000
Legacy  75,000,000
Total Expenditure ***  955,000,000

 

CAPITAL BUDGET Amount (Cdn)
Regional Stadium  42,000,000
Regional Arena  30,000,000
Regional Fieldhouse  30,000,000
Langford Student Residences  60,000,000
University of Victoria – Field Hockey Pitches (3)  10,000,000
University of Victoria – McKinnon Gym  2,000,000
Saanich Commonwealth Pool/Fieldhouse  35,000,000
Saanich Commonwealth Pool 2,000,000
Venue Overlay 87,000,000
TOTAL  298,000,000

Victoria is competing internationally with Liverpool and Birmingham in Britain and Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia in a race that began after Durban in South Africa was stripped of the Games it originally won in 2015.  Since this is a bid to replace Durban, the winning bid will have to organize the Games is a shorter time frame than normal and the bid process has remained in a tight schedule.

The British bids, both that had originally set targets on the 2026 edition of the Games, are considered favorites in this fast-forward race since they had an early start.  They will be submitting documents to the British Commonwealth Games authority Friday as part of the domestic bid process.  Both plans include mostly ready-built facilities.

The Games are being held in Gold Coast Australia next year.

After the bids submit a detailed 300-page plan at the end of September, presentations will be made to the CGF in October.  The winning bid is expected to be elected in December.

Robert Livingstone

About Robert Livingstone

Robert Livingstone is a senior editor, award-nominated journalist and author, covering Olympic bid business as founder of GamesBids.com as well as providing freelance support for print and Web publications around the world. He is a member of the Olympic Journalists Association and the International Society of Olympic Historians. Follow him @enotsgnivil

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